2018 Top 10 New to Me

Drew and I debated about if we’d start blogging this week or next. He wasn’t feeling well, and my work is about to get crazy, and I don’t know exactly when, but today it’s quiet so far.

So I decided to try to get a post up today. It should be an easy one, I’m going to write about my top 10 games I played for the first time in 2018.

I had a great gaming year, with playing 135 individual games, with a large number of new ones.

A couple honorable mentions that didn’t quite make the top 10: Azul, Stuffed Fables, Space Base, & One Deck Dungeon. All are fantastic games that were very close to making the cut.

I better not waste too long on this part, so without further ado, here are my favorite 10 games I played for the first time in 2018.

10) Gloomhaven– The #1 game on BGG has made a big impression on me too. The combat system is creative and exciting, and this might have finished higher up the list had I gotten to explore it more. I look forward to playing this more in the future.

9) Patchwork– I had played the app before 2018, but we got an actual copy of the boardgame this past year. I grew up playing Tetris, and that style of tile placement is fun to me. Dina’s a crafty person, so the theme appeals to her, although the theme isn’t particularly strong.

8) Codenames Duet– We love Codenames, and the buzz with this one was good, so I was excited to finally pick it up. It’s fun, difficult to win, and plays extremely quick. It ended up tied as my third most played game this year.

7) Ganz schön clever– Although my Top 10 doesn’t reflect it, 2018 was the year of the Roll & Write for me. I played 7 or 8 different ones, and really enjoy the genre as a whole. This was the best of an excellent bunch. The use of the dice and the sheet is fun and interesting, and I look forward to seeing if they have some expansions come out soon and what they do with them (I believe there was something in the works.).

6) Palm Island– A game that wasn’t even on my radar until August, and that was because the Kickstarter backers were starting to get their copies. I checked out their website and ordered a copy, and it turns out there weren’t many available, my timing was just lucky. It’s basically a solo game, although there are rules to play co-op, I have yet to try them. It’s 17 cards, and you use these cards to do things like generate resources to upgrade other cards and play to get the highest score. The clever part is making feats to work like achievements or trophies to video gamers. You have targets to shoot for to get an additional card to add to the deck. You can only include 1 though, so it’s fun to try the different cards to see which you can use most effectively. I should probably just write a review so I can gush more about this extremely clever little game. Eric has also gotten a copy of the latest printing after I showed him how to play it at Extra Life. As a plus, it only takes 10-15 minutes, and can be played in just your hands, no table required. I played it over 25 times after my copy arrived in early October.

5) Legendary: Buffy the Vampire Slayer– I’ve talked about my love of the Legendary system before. Heck, Legendary: Marvel is my favorite game right now. I also love the show, so when this was available as a deal of the day on Miniature Market one day, I jumped on it. I hadn’t really heard any buzz, but while waiting for it to arrive, I checked out the few reviews, and people really liked it, even people who had no knowledge of the Buffyverse. I really love this game. It’s the Legendary system, but the card interactions and the Day/Night mechanic add some really cool things to the system itself. If I wanted to play a Legendary game quickly, this would be the one I’d grab. The card names are also contain some great references to the show.

4) Aeon’s End– Another game that wasn’t really on my radar, and it really should have been. I think the art is just so-so, and I believe that influenced my opinion. It’s a fantasy themed deck builder, and I love both of those things. It’s apparently great solo, so that’s another plus. Eric has a copy, and he taught us at Extra Life, and it was a blast. The part about not shuffling your deck is kind of hard for me to wrap my head around, although in our 2 plays both Eric and Joe have tried to shuffle, and I haven’t yet, so I am encouraged by that. I really wish I had known about the game when the Legacy version was on Kickstarter, but I hope to pick up a copy of that eventually. Heck, I am hoping to pick up my own copy of the actual game at some point. We have played it twice so far, and it’s been great, so I hope to be able to play it more in the future.

3) Charterstone– The first (And so far only.) Legacy game I’ve finished. But it was a fantastic experience. It’s basically a worker placement game, but the new mechanics and options added as the game goes on makes it fun. We played through all 12 games in like 2 months, and Eric bought the recharge pack for us to play it again, probably later this year. I also screwed up a couple of things, one that quite likely made me the winner, so I am interested to see how the game plays now that we kind of know what to expect.

2) Eldritch Horror– Through most of the year, I expected this to be my #1. I traded for this late last year, but didn’t get it to the table. I’ve only played this 2 player so far, so maybe things will change, but I don’t see why. I have thoroughly enjoyed every play of this, the story it tells is fun, and the mechanics and turn length don’t get in the way of it. It’s quite a bit simpler to play than it looks, and that was a big plus for me. I am really hoping to play this more in 2019 and hopefully actually win a game.

Sorry about the glare.

1) Arkham Horror: The Card Game– I bought this for my birthday. I had been interested in it after seeing how highly rated on BGG it was, but it’s an Living Card Game, so I held off. I’m not a huge Mythos fan, but you wouldn’t know that based on my top 2. Everything about this game blew me away. How they made an LCG co-op, and it works extremely well. The fact that they made it so winning isn’t required to move on to the next scenario is a big plus. And also how they made a card game tell a story, which is probably what surprised me the most. I will likely never collect everything for this game, but I am planning on focusing on one story wave at a time and play through them. I am often thinking about the game, and even started listening to a podcast based on it. Very fun, both solo and with 2 players, and I can’t wait to play it more.



That’s it. My Top 10 New to Me Games for 2018. There are a ton of games I haven’t played, and I am excited to see what I get to try in 2019. Let me know your favorites from the last year, or even your opinions on my choices.

d20 List: Top 10 ‘Experience’ Games

Editors Note:  An earlier version of the post had some wonky formatting and Andrew forgot how to count, so he only had 9 items.  This has been corrected, and the writer is completely mortified by the error 😉 )

Hello! It has been a while.  My (Andrew) family has been continuously sick for the past 6 weeks, so we’ve really been focusing on surviving and not really worrying about things like board games or writing about them.

But that all changes today! I realized it had been a while since we had done a d20 review, so I spun up the dice and rolled a 10…which is a really original number for lists 🙂

I decided to challenge Ryan and myself to think about games that can be classified as an “Experience”.  Now, this might mean something different to both of us, but when we were talking about it I described them as this:

“Those games that you may only play once a year due to the sheer size of it, or something like Pandemic Legacy that is an evolving experience after many plays.  Games that almost get to “that was an experience but I never want to do it again, or do it for a very long time” or it could even be something you played at a CON that’s out of print so you probably won’t experience it again.

  1. Charterstone: I called Charterstone my Game of the Year 2017, which was pretty high praise considering we played it twice and it came out in November (or thereabouts).

    While we haven’t been able to continue our campaign recently, my wife and I still fondly talk about our time playing it, although I don’t see myself/us playing through the campaign again, even though I bought the recharge pack.
  2. Memoir ‘44 D-Day Landings:  This is a specific expansion to Memoir ‘44 that takes 6 maps in the Breakthrough and Overlord formats and smushes them together so you can play Operation Neptune..if you can find the space. I ran a game of this at BGG Con Spring this year, and it was a ton of fun, but also a surprising amount of work.  Due to the space, time, and rule investment, I can’t imagine playing this anywhere other than a Con, but still feeling super satisfied each time I finish.
  3. Twilight Imperium 4e:  I played this for the first time a few weeks ago, and it was incredible (I wrote about it here).  However, this is one I don’t see myself playing more than once or twice a year due to the number of people needed and the time investment it takes.  It was a ton of fun, and at the end I did sort of sit there in a state of awe, but it also took a lot out of me (as weird as that is to say about a board game).  I was drained when we finished.
  4. Star Wars: The Queen’s Gambit:  This is one of those that’s an experience because it’s so hard to find.  Long out of print, this is a sort of 3 front ameritrash Star wars game that coincided with the release of Episode 1.

    I was able to play this at the first BGG Con I went to since they had a copy in the library.  It was a fun game, not great, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t want a copy for my collection.

    Side Note:  If you are looking for a game to substitute for this one and still get a similar experience, I wholeheartedly recommend Risk: Star Wars Edition.
  5. Arkham Horror with All Expansions:  Arkham Horror is how I got started in gaming.  A fraternity brother brought it home one evening and so we went down to the dining room where there was plenty of table space and promptly got devoured by Azathoth.

    Eventually, we would play marathon games where we would play against Great Old Ones after Great Older One.  Eventually we would add in an expansion or two, but we never played with all the expansions.

    I see these games pop up at Conventions I attend from time to time, and I haven’t yet joined in one, but I want to.  But something tells me I would never want to do it again (especially since I haven’t played Arkham Horror in a very long time).
  6. Roads and Boats:  This is a game that doesn’t look the prettiest, but it is super deep.  It’s a game about managing and upgrading a supply chain, while being opportunistic and taking from your opponents who haven’t been paying attention.

    It also takes a while to play; a recent teaching game I ran at a Con took 5 hours or so. That’s a lot of time to devote to a game about moving geese, donkeys, and other transporters around, and it’s a real brain burner, so this one hits the table about once a year or so.
  7. Tales of the Arabian Nights:  To me, Tales of the Arabian Nights (TotAN) is not a game, it’s an interactive story.  This is a huge choose your own adventure game set in the world of 1001 Nights. However, there isn’t a whole lot of strategy or meaningful decisions to be made, so I only like to play it from time to time with a group that is looking for just that: a fun night laughing at what hijinx our characters get into.
  8. Monster Wargames: This one is a bit of a cop out because it’s a classification of game, not a game itself, but I have a ton and I couldn’t pick just one.  A Monster Wargame is a wargame that has a ton of counters and a huge map. Some examples are The Devil’s Cauldron and The Battle for Normandy.

    I have a ton of these, and while you can play smaller scenarios, there is something about seeing an epic setup of maps on your table.  These can take a long time to set up, usually have a pretty dense rule set, and take a long time to play, so most people play them with VASSAL.  I can’t imagine, though, after playing a whole full game of one that I would be itching to do it again soon.
  9. Sentinels of the Multiverse: Age of OblivAeon:  Full disclosure: This is the only one on the list I haven’t yet played.  This was the last Sentinels of the Multiverse Kickstarter, and it provided a mode where the heroes have to fight OblivAeon, who can be compared to Thanos from the Marvel universe.All the things I’ve heard from people who have played it say that it’s long, complicated and takes up a ton of table space.  Based upon that, I can definitely see myself getting this set up when I want something meaty, but I can’t imagine I will play it a ton.
  10. Silverton:  This is game about mining and prospecting in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.  It’s a thinky economic game that actually can play solo which is somewhat rare. However, it’s a little fiddly and games can take a while, so we normally only get this out once or twice a year.

 

Ryan’s Picks

When Drew first suggested this topic, I took it completely wrong. I was considering only my individual favorite gaming experiences. I was listing experience games, but also those. Then I re-read his text, and fixed my list. This would have been a really long post if I went with gaming experiences in general, although I might use that for a personal post in the future.

Here’s my list in no particular order:

  1. Die Macher – This was once a top 10 BGG game (Even #1 I believe before I joined.). It’s a game about German elections, so the theme isn’t exactly attention grabbing.  It may be THE prototypical “Euro” game, all cube pushing. It’s like a 3-5 hour playtime. I’m not going to want to play it much, but I would gladly play it again. The mechanics make sense. There are a LOT of them, but once you play through a turn or 2, it makes sense. But it’s never a game I think I would knowingly play well. I’m just never going to dedicate enough time to get good at it. 
  2. This War of Mine – Ok, I haven’t actually played this yet, but the reviewers all seem to say the same things. They all mention it’s a well designed game and practically a work of art, but it’s depressing and not fun. I love the idea of a game that may not be fun, but is more a work of art game. I traded for this recently, and I do enjoy the video game. Or I should say I enjoy the challenge of the video game, it really is difficult and a bummer to watch your characters continually suffer. The board game apparently mimics this well. 
  3. Time Stories – A very interesting gaming experience. Start a story, fail, start over with some knowledge, likely fail again, repeat until successful. Believe it or not, it is fun. I’ve only played the base scenario, and I am looking forward to trying more of them. 
  4. Charterstone – The only legacy game I’ve finished so far (That list is really just this and Pandemic Legacy.). We had a blast, although I screwed up a rule early, and misread a card midway through, and continued to misuse that card for points for the next several games, and of course, guess who won? We already have a recharge pack to play it again. 
  5. Eldritch Horror – I am not obsessed with the Cthulhu mythos, but the games tend to be really good. This one may end up being my top new game I played this year. I’ve only played it 2 player, but have enjoyed it immensely. It tells a nice story to go with simple mechanics. 
  6. Tales of Arabian Nights – A fun choose your own adventure style game. Not a great cohesive story, and it can take a long time for what it is, but it’s a game I’ve enjoyed the couple of times I’ve gotten to play it. 
  7. The Mind – This one probably barely qualifies for this list, but it’s almost exclusively an experience when you play it. It’s quick, but the game itself is just how much you enjoy the experience of not talking, just feeling when you or your teammates need to play a card. Not for everyone, but I very much enjoy it. 
  8. Formula De – This one is especially great with more players. Having several people racing closely, causing issues, maybe even blocking the exact spot you wanted to go. It’s a blast with at least 6,better with 8-10, and one of my best gaming experiences period involved 12 people at a con. 
  9. Runebound – One of my favorite games. I really enjoyed the first edition and fell in love with the second edition. Sadly I haven’t played the latest version. Always fun, but it can take a LONG time if people play cautiously. It just take a while to build up your character. I have learned to not be too timid early on anymore. 
  10. Descent: Journeys in the Dark – I have however played both editions of this game. I prefer the new edition, with its streamlined rules, but the first edition was a better experience, taking several hours of players vs Overlord battles. Still one of the best dungeon crawls. I really considered Gloomhaven for this spot, but went with the one I’d played the most, I’ve only played 2 sessions of GH, although we are trying to plan for more, so that might replace Descent eventually.

There you have it.  Ryan and I’s Top 10 “Experience” Games.  Have you played any of these? Any other ones you would add? Let us know in the comments!

Top 10 Dice Games

I love dice.  I probably have an unhealthy obsession with dice, to be honest.  For a while, in my DnD group, when we would start a new campaign or a new character, I would go out and buy a new set of polyhedral dice.

The draw from the “What Should We Play” deck was Quarriors, which got me thinking…dice are probably one of my favorite components, so what better way to come back from an unintentional hiatus than writing about my top 10 dice games.

Castles of BurgundyRavensburger

Dice Laying, Tile Placement and ‘Worker Placement’ are probably my favorite mechanics, and CoB has them both.  I have enjoyed every play of this game.  There are numerous player boards that you can play with that require you to adopt different strategies (even if I haven’t played most of them).  This is one that many, many people in my game group enjoy even if we don’t play it that often.

KingsburgFantasy Flight Games

This is probably my wife’s favorite game on this list.  This is one game that combines Dice rolling and worker placement and requires a surprising amount of planning and mitigating your plan if an opposing player takes your spot.  I think this is a game that is better if you play with the expansion, but any time we’ve played it it’s been enjoyable.

St MaloRavensburger

This is a roll and write city building game that was a bit of a surprise. I bought it on a whim at a convention and ended up playing it 2 or 3 times that weekend.  It’s quick and easy to teach and the boards are coated so you use a whiteboard style marker, which for some reason is really entertaining to me.

QuarriorsWizKids

When Quarriors first came out it seemed as though they had struck gold with a confrontational but not too confrontational “dicebuilding” game.  We had to make some adjustments to make it work for 2 players (we play to the 4 player point limit) but we enjoyed the custom dice, the art, and the way the game works: it felt to us like a dice version of Magic the Gathering.

D-Day DiceValley Games

I hesitated to put this on my list.  I was a Line for Life Kickstarter backer of the first edition which has been marred by some terrible dealings with the now defunct Valley Games, but this is actually being reprinted by Word Forge Games, who along with the designer, is going above and beyond to atone for the sins of the previous publisher.

When it was released this was a really unique mechanic along with a theme that I loved.  The D-Day landings are by far my favorite military operation to study and read about, and it’s co-op and solo capable.  Custom dice are always awesome, and this comes with tons of them.  I really need to get it to the table more.

DicemastersWizKids

I’ve talked about this in previous posts, but this really made me feel like I was playing Magic: The Dice Gathering.  With all the IPs offered, I really like the limited deck building aspect of it and the gameplay is pretty straightforward.  They took Quarriors and kept the streamlined feel of it while making it feel like you could actually get your engine going.  Just beware if you are a completionist.

SagradaFloodgate Games

I’ve given a review of Sagrada and mentioned it in previous posts, so I’ll give my abbreviated thoughts:

If you can find a copy, buy it.  You won’t be disappointed.  It’s a puzzly dice placement game that looks gorgeous.

Roll PlayerThunderworks Games

My favorite part of DnD is rolling characters, and that’s what you are doing in Roll Player.  It’s a clever dice manipulation game that is a lot deeper under the surface.  The first time I played this, I did terribly, and immediately wanted to get a copy so I could keep playing it to try to get better.  Not many games do that to me.

Elder SignFantasy Flight Games

I’ve probably played the app version of this more than the board game version, but Elder Sign is a quickish Yahtzee style game (for lack of any other way to describe it) set in the Arkham universe.  It does a good job of integrating the theme of it’s bigger brothers Arkham and Eldritch Horror and there are a good selection of expansions to integrate as well.

Carson CityEagle-Gryphon Games (my copy)

I love Westerns.  Carson City puts you in charge of developing a western city complete with gunfights, prospecting, and staking claims.  The first time I played this I was warned that it is completely possible that your opponents might be able to lock you out of doing anything, and while that didn’t happen to me it’s definitely a more in your face worker placement game than I normally play.  The dice are used to seed the board with buildings, landmarks, etc and for a few action spaces, but it’s the use of them to determine coordinates that stuck with me, as this was the first game that I had played to do so (see also Flash Point: Fire Rescue).

Well, there you have it.  A quick look at my top 10 Dice games.  Honorable mentions would probably be Dungeons and Dragons and wargames, but I’m glad I could come up with 10 game that I enjoy, some of which I think are overlooked at times.  What dice games do you enjoy? Let me know in the comments!

Top 10 Wargames

I was introduced into the board gaming hobby at large by hex and counter-esque Wargames.  I got my first Bachelor’s Degree in history, so seeing battles take place on the table in front of me always was a selling point (which is why I probably have too many Normandy wargames).

There are a lot of people who think Wargames are super involved and detailed and the rules take forever to learn and twice as long to play.  And they are partially right.  There are definitely wargames that I have tried to read the rules for, was unable to understand them remotely, and (at the time) didn’t have YouTube tutorials to look up, so I passed on them.  But there are also very accessible wargames as well.  The games on this list present both a wide range of complex options and entry points into the wargaming hobby.  I think I’ll probably do a “wargaming primer” post for people who are interested but don’t have any idea what ZOC means (zone of control) and what the difference between tactical and operational level games are.  For now, I’ll try to keep the jargon limited or explain if I use a term that doesn’t translate well to overall gaming.  Also, some of these games are solitaire only, where you play against the game system itself.  A lot of them are, actually, because most of my gaming group aren’t that into wargames.  I’ll note those as well.

One final point before we get to the important stuff:  These all fall in to my definition of a wargame (which is I know it when I see it).  These may not fall in to your definition, and that’s okay.  We can disagree on things.  What I absolutely hate is people using a game like Memoir ’44 or Twilight Struggle as a litmus test for people who want to enter into wargaming and having people say “Oh, that’s not a wargame, you aren’t a real wargamer”.  I’ve had it happen to me, it sucks and it’s not a good way to introduce and grow the hobby.

If you are new to wargames, check out this helpful geeklist on Boardgamegeek: Wargames??? YES YOU CAN!

With that out of the way, here are my top 10 Wargames, [with the publishers in brackets]

Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear (2nd Edition) [Academy Games]

This is a 2 player World War II tactical game (rough idea is that it’s a very focused scale; usually a small part of one battle or one battle, depending on the time).  It uses an action point system, where each player gets a certain pool of points that they can use to do various things like move, fire, assault (moving into a hex with an enemy unit and fighting).  It also includes cards that allow you to do various things.

I have really enjoyed my few plays of this system.  There is also a solo expansion that lets you play against the game, and while I own it, I haven’t had the chance to sit down and digest the rules for it.

I like it because it’s simple and the narrative that can develop really gets me into the action.  I feel it’s rules light and the rules start simple and gradually add complexity with each new scenario, so you can take your time with it if you are just starting out.

Silent Victory [Consim Press]

Silent Victory is a solitaire WWII game where you control a submarine crew.  This game doesn’t look like what many people think of when they think of wargames.  There isn’t really a map, and there are a lot of charts.  Some people argue that there aren’t many meaningful decisions to be made in this game because you are left to the die rolls on the charts and that’s about it, but there are some decisions you can make:  how to load out your sub, at what range to fire, what targets to fire on and what ones to leave alone.

This game is in my top 10 because it is quick to play a patrol or two and the story that develops is absolutely phenomenal.  You get attached to your submariners and your commander, and it always leaves you wondering “maybe I should have taken a shot at that last convoy when I had a chance”.

The level of detail is also astounding; there is an entire chart of Japanese capital and warships that you can sink, as well as tons of charts with various smaller ships.

Memoir ’44 [Days of Wonder]

This was my first wargame.  This is a 2 player variable scale WWII game.  It’s primary mechanic is that it’s card driven, and each card allows you to activate certain sectors of the game board.  There are certain scenarios that have objectives you can hold, but usually you are just trying to eliminate a certain number of enemy forces to win.

There are tons of expansions for this, and I own just about all of them.  I don’t get this played nearly at all, but you can play everything from one battle on one map to a campaign over a series of battles, to the D-Day landings over 6 maps that when put together don’t fit in my game room (Seriously…I haven’t done it yet but I will one day).

There are minis for each unit and each nation has a different color.  Seriously, the amount of content that has been released for this system is astounding….dang, I really need to get this to the table again.

The Greatest Day: Sword, Juno, and Gold Beaches [Multi-Man Publishing]

This is the first game I haven’t actually ‘played’ on this list.  I have set it up on a computer program called VASSAL because this thing is huge.  It is part of the Grand Tactical Series and it’s a bit of a zoomed out tactical look at the D-Day landings on the British and Canadian beaches.

This is what’s known as a monster wargame because there are a lot of counters and a lot of map space.  You can play a single map scenario, or you can combine them to play the whole enchilada.

This is probably the most ‘traditional’ hex and counter wargame on my list.  I have two other games in the GTS series, and every time I see them on the shelf, I go onto YouTube, look up a play list on how to play the system and get excited…then don’t commit.  Maybe this year is the year I actually play a scenario of this.

Ambush! [Victory Games]

This was my first solitaire wargame, and it’s one of the few games I’ve purchased twice.  Ambush! was published in 1983 and was designed by one of the highest regarded solo wargame designers, John Butterfield.

Ambush! is a tactical WWII (do you see a theme here?) solitaire game where you control a squad of American soldiers in different scenarios in Europe.  The counters each are an individual soldier, and much like an RPG, they each have different skills and weapons that you can roll on tables to create.

Ambush! is similar to a choose your own adventure book.  You have a paragraph book that you consult whenever your squad does something (outside of combat) that drives the action forward; you might hear a bullet whiz by your head, you might see a plane going down in the distance, who knows?

There are quite a few expansions for this, and since the game is out of print, they can be hard to find.  Luckily, I own them all, as well as the Battle Hymn game (which is Ambush! set in WWII Pacific theatre) and it’s expansion.

Since it’s paragraph driven, there can be limited replayability since you know what will happen each mission, but if you are like me and take your time between scenarios, that shouldn’t be an issue.

I normally don’t rank games, but Ambush! is without a doubt my number one Solitaire wargame.

Thunderbolt/Apache Leader (TAL) [Dan Verssen Games]

TAL is a solitaire game where you control a squadron of close air support aircraft.  There are tons of campaigns to choose from, and each campaign has a bunch of different situations you can play.

There are two parts to this game.  The first is actually choosing your squadron.  You get to choose both the aircraft that comprise your group and the pilots who actually pilot the craft.  Each pilot has different skill levels and at each of those levels, they have different ratings for different ways to fire weapons, removing stress, and they can gain XP to level up to get better stats.

Once you’ve done that, you actually fly missions where you are taking out enemy battalions that may have special abilities that hinder you in the earlier mentioned portion of the game.  You load out each aircraft with specific weapons for the enemies you’ll face, and then you fly the battle out on a map comprised of various hexes with varying degrees of cover that you and your enemies can use.

The RPG/campaign type elements and the story that evolves as you play this game make it replayable time and time again

Liberty or Death: The American Insurrection [GMT Games]

Liberty or Death is a COIN game set in the Revolutionary War period.  COIN games are relatively new in the hobby, but COIN is an overall system that focuses on “guerrilla warfare, asymmetric warfare, and COunterINsurgencies around the world – in both historical and contemporary conflicts” (taken from http://www.gmtgames.com/c-36-coin-series.aspx).

There are tons of settings currently, from Cuba in the 1958 revolution to present day Afghanistan to Roman Britain.  The thing about COIN games is that there are usually 4 sides, and while they may work together they each have their own specific goals on how to win the game.  You can also play these solo as GMT provides flowcharts for each side that you can use as AI players.

The first game I tried in the COIN series really didn’t click for me, but Liberty or Death came strongly recommended by a few wargamers I follow on Twitter.  I ordered it on a whim, set it up, went through the example of play and I was hooked.  For some reason, it just clicked.  I am looking forward to my first 4 player playthrough of this next month; it’s how I’m celebrating my birthday this year!

Commands and Colors: Ancients (CC:A) [GMT Games]

Commands and Colors: Ancients is in the same system as Memoir ’44, but instead of WWII you get a wide swath of ancient history, mainly focusing on the Mediterranean.  It doesn’t have miniatures, but stickered blocks (that the buyer has to sticker themselves) that represent various units.  There are tons of expansions that have art that reflects the timeframe for each expansion (for example, Republican Roman blocks are grey, while Imperial Roman blocks are Red).  It’s also a bit more complex than Memoir ’44 because the different unit types can do ranged fire or close combat and have some other special rules.

When I want something quick to play, but want it to have a bit of oomph to it, CC:A is pretty much my go to.

D-Day at Omaha Beach [Decision Games]

D-Day at Omaha Beach is a tactical (there’s that word again..) solitaire game of storming Omaha Beach during the D-Day landings in Normandy.  This one is also designed by John Butterfield, and it’s probably the oddest looking map of the bunch.  The reason for this is the game system uses different color coded dots to determine who can fire at you and how deadly it is, and so there are different dots in each hex.  This is a game where cards drive a lot of the action, and so even though it focuses on one segment of one battle, I haven’t had two games that have played out the same way.  This too generates a great narrative, and was successful enough that they published two more games in the series for the landings at Tarawa and Peleliu.  I would say it’s a step up from entry level, but there are plenty of playthroughs and player aids online that help get the flow of the game down.

Hornet Leader: Carrier Air Operations (HL: CAO) [Dan Verssen Games]

Last and certainly not least is Hornet Leader: Carrier Air Operations.  This game is in the same ‘Leader’ series as Thunderbolt/Apache leader, but instead of close air support you are flying fighters and bombers off of air carriers.  This is my favorite Leader game, and I don’t think anything will come along to unseat it (unless someone happens to buy me a pledge level of the Corsair Leader Kickstarter that’s running at the time of this writing).  Growing up I was enamored with the F-14 Tomcat, and in this game that is one of the major planes you can take on missions.

The game is structured much like TAL, so it would be pretty repetitive to dive into that again, but the aircraft and armaments are different, and the way you play the battles out are different as well; in HL:CAO you are focusing on one target and the anti-air emplacements around it.  There is even a Cthullu expansion which I own, but haven’t had a chance to play ( I want to get through the base game campaigns, and since it was released in 2010 I have some work to do).

 

Well, there you have it.  My Top 10 Wargames.  Are you a wargamer? What’s your favorite game or system to play?  If you aren’t, do you have any interest in trying out a wargame? Leave me a comment and let me know!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Top 10 Non Solo, Non Wargame Games

My Top 10 Non Solo, Non Wargame Games

Finally! My first real top 10 list.

Originally I thought I was going to do my top 10 gateway games…but then I realized I haven’t ever sat down and thought about what my top gateway games are.  I thought about doing top 10 wargames, but that’s definitely going to take more time to write about than I have, especially if I am keeping myself to my Wed. night deadline.  II was going to do my top 10 overall games, which I am sure I will do at a later date, but I am equal parts wargamer, solo gamer, and euro game (and yes I am sure there are other distinctions that people could make but I’m already writing so we are just going with it).  So, I figure I would go with my gut picks for my top 10 games that are not designed for solo play (co-op games that can be played solo are fine) and that aren’t wargames.  I’ll also add that these are in no particular order (because I don’t need to make things harder for myself) and that for any of my top 10 lists, I have to own the game unless otherwise stated).

So, here you are, my top 10 non solo non wargames games:

Imperial Settlers

As a former history major, I love anything with a civilization component to it.  I also love games that let me develop an engine, and that have variable player powers or strategies.  Imperial Settlers has all of these.  The first time I played it seemed to take forever, and that soured me for a while but once I played again and really wrapped my head around the gameplay, I knew I had to have this game.  I don’t think I’ve ever turned down someone wanting to play a game of this, and with various expansions that can be added, I still haven’t explored all this has to offer.

Viticulture Essential Edition

The first time I played this, I wasn’t sold on it.  A friend convinced me to give it another try, and after I did, I really, really came to enjoy this one.  A worker placement game where you are in charge of a vineyard, Viticulture has a ton of extra content you can add with the Tuscany expansion, which I am told makes the game better.  I think it’s pretty great as is.  It employs a ‘wake up early’ mechanic for turn order, which I really thought fit well, and you have to strategically save your workers as you place them on different halves of the board for different seasons (meaning If you place all your workers in summer, you can’t take any winter actions).

I have everything in the Essential Edition line, and haven’t played this a ton, but this is actually my wife and I’s game this week, thanks to the Deck of What Should We Play (see my earlier post) so it gets to hit the table this weekend, and I am excited.

BrewCrafters

I know, I know, another game about beverages.  Well this one is just as good, especially because I am a craft brew fan.  This worker placement game has each player running their own brewery and the biggest thing I remember about the first time playing it was that it’s tight.  With tons of different beers players can choose from, this is one of the best Kickstarters I have been a part of.

Castles of Burgundy

I am a sucker for anything with dice.  This has dice and tile placement and tons of different boards that you can choose from.  I think I’ve played with the ‘starting player’ board most times, so this is one I need to revist often.  It’s thinky, but not so thinky that you don’t want to play anything after it.

Trains

I am not a fan of most deckbuilders.  For some of them, it just seems like you are cycling through a deck to score points, which doesn’t do a whole lot to draw me in.  Trains, though, is a deck builder that is also an area control game, of sorts.  Adding in that extra mechanic, so I have something I am actually doing with the cards is what makes this game perfect for me.  Again, I have tons of expansion maps for this one that don’t get played.  I should probably remedy that.

Suburbia

Just like I’m a sucker for anything civilization themed, I am also a sucker for anything city building related.  This was the first city builder I played, and I actually think it was the first game I ever preordered.  I’ll also associate this game with the first Con I went to, as it was in the Hot Games room that year, and it was my most played game at that Con.

It’s a bit fiddly, but theme fits perfectly with this one (i.e., airports by suburbs are a bad idea).  This is one I haven’t played in quite some time…I should remedy that soon.

Marvel: Legendary

Yes, I know this is a deckbuilder.  But it’s a deckbuilder with Superheroes!! Marvel Superheroes!!

Seriously, I love this game for the situations it puts you in.  I don’t think I’ve ever played a bad game of it, even after getting my butt handed to me 3 times over the course of 3 hours.  We sort of overplayed this one when I was first introduced to it, so I cooled on it, but I don’t think I’d turn down a game of this if someone asked.

Legacy: The Testament of Duke De Crecy

This is a ‘worker’ placement game about making your family tree.  I kid you not, you literally build your family out with cards from the game.  This was a very surprising game to me that is sort of cutthroat (easy for people to play their workers where you need it) but the game even gives you a way to mitigate that.  It’s set in the late 1700s, so seeing some of the history come into play between the different nationalities is pretty cool too.  Oh, and the art is amazing.

Fair warning though:  this game does involve the potential loss of a child or a mother in childbirth.  I didn’t fully explain that the first time I taught this, and while none of us playing had children or had been in that situation, it was still sort of jarring, so this is one of those that you might want to give your game group a heads up on before you start playing if there are new players.

Castle Panic

This is a co-op tower defense game.  It’s light, there’s strategy involved, and you can have giant boulders that come through and crash your 3-D castle.

When we got this game, I played it 3-4 times in the first 48 hours we had it.  For me, that speaks very much to the replayability and enjoyability of the game.

Silverton

This is a game about train railways, mining, and prospecting in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.  Sounds like a real barn burner, eh?  It involves building routes, staking claims to mines, and manipulating the market in various cities. The few times I have played this, I have always emjoyed it and I think part of that is because the group knew that this game definitely takes a time investment.  So long as you can devote the time and take this game as an experience, it’s always fun

So there you have it.  My top 10 non-wargame, non-solo games.  Have you played any of these? Would any of these make it into your top 10?