Extra Life Half Marathon 04/27/2019

I actually started that long overdue Palm Island review, but I kind of got busy and forgot to get back to it. I don’t want to rush it, so I’m doing another filler post today.

Drew and I both participate in a yearly Extra Life 24 hour gaming marathon run by our friend David Cook, usually in early November (It’s actually on the day we go back from Daylight Savings, so it’s 25 hours.). But we like gaming for a cause, and are always looking for a reason to get together with our friends, so a discussion started about having a “half” marathon, and go from 10 am to 10 pm.

I will say that I am awful at raising money for these things. I am just not someone who wants to hit people up for donations. But I do help out in other ways, by donating games as prizes for our raffles, and smaller things like that.

Ok, so we got together this past Saturday for a long gaming day. Dina dropped Joe and I off at a little after 10, and Drew, Bryan, & David were hanging out with David’s family. We all stood around and chatted for a while before we went into the room.

I decided to start us off with the current hotness, Wingspan. I recently got a copy, and was personally raving about it. This was going to be my 4th time playing, and my second time teaching. Lucky for me, Joe and Clint had both played it also, so it was only teaching Bryan and Drew.

It went over quite well. Drew was almost immediately texting his wife to ask for it for Father’s day. Bryan said he had been trying to convince himself it wasn’t going to be good, and was unable to keep that attitude. I have realized that I obviously have no idea who’s winning, looking at Drew about halfway through and mentioning that he and I were getting our butts kicked. I ended up winning, and he was a close 3rd. 5 players was an interesting game though, and except for the extra length, it scaled really well. I’ve now played it with 1, 3, and 5, and it’s been a blast and worked really well with each. It’s currently one of my favorite games.

Dead Last was the next game we played. Pretty much everyone who was there at the time was involved. This is not my style of party game, but it played extremely quickly, so it wasn’t too bad either. It kind of reminded me of Ca$h ‘N Gun$, which is another game I’m terrible at. You discuss who to kill each round, and the trick is if you aren’t part of the majority, you’re out. I think I only got through the first selection once.

I don’t think I’d pick it to play, but I could probably be talked into trying it again.

After a quick lunch break, Bryan taught us Alea Iacta Est. It’s a dice placement game. There are a lot of rules to how you can play dice, but high rolls aren’t always preferred, so it’s difficult sometimes to get what you want or need. We had a very close finish, with Drew, Clint, and I all having the most points, and Joe was only a couple behind. I ended up winning the tiebreaker.

I’m not rushing out to get my own copy, but it was interesting, although I suspect I’d do worse next game because I think I kind of know what I’m doing.

So shortly after that Dina and Aleksia arrived, and I had promised to play some games with them. Aleksia chose to play The Lion Guard: Protect the Pridelands. This is a really cute, quick, and not super easy kids cooperative game. The Lion Guard character figures are fantastic. We do win more often than not, but it’s probably 60-40. We won this game really quickly, which isn’t a common occurrence for us.

Aleksia and I moved on to Outfoxed. This is another kids co-op game. It uses some simple deduction, and she is really good at the game. My one complaint is that it’s probably too easy. We win about 70% of the time. Unfortunately we suffered a rare loss in this one. The dice kind of abandoned us, and we needed about 1 more clue to be able to figure out the thief.

Dina and Aleksia were playing some 2 player games, so I thought I’d try a quick game of Palm Island. I’ve talked about that a lot, so I’ll wait till I do my review.

Aleksia had seen some of the other kids playing a game with some cool pieces, and wanted to try it. So Dina and I were trying to learn the game Sumo Ham Slam. Drew came over too, so we had 3 adults and 1 5 yr old playing it. As you can see from the picture, it’s really cute. The game isn’t particularly good, it involves magnets and sticks, but it was a silly time for us. Not something I need to own, but silly enough to want to be willing to play again, especially with kids.

A few of us walked a couple of blocks down to The Pennant restaurant and enjoyed some good food, and then we went back so Bryan could teach us Ginkgopolis.

This is a pretty neat city building game. I was also not at the right point of the day to have something so complicated explained to me. I had a good time, and would gladly play the game again, but I had no clue what I needed to do to score points, and finished last, quite a long way away from winning. Dina pulled off a late move that changed the scoring dramatically and pulled off a win.

One last game was decided upon as the evening wore down. Drew taught Bryan and I his print and play copy of College Basketball Dynasty. I love the idea of sport simulation games, and I used to play a lot of them on my computer, so I was really interested in how this one worked.

It had some neat ideas. We only had time to play about half a game, so we were just getting to the point where many of our best players were going to graduate, so I was interested in what would happen after that. I liked the game, and am hoping to get to try it again sometime. Drew won 3 National Titles to win this one.

That was it. I played a lot of games with a bunch of my favorite people, so it was a fantastic day. My family also won a couple of games that had been generously donated by Asgard’s Gate game shop. Joe won a copy of the 10th Anniversary Notre Dame and Dina won a copy of Dicey Goblins. I’ve always enjoyed Notre Dame, and I look forward to trying Dicey Goblins, it looks like a nice push your luck dice game.

What have you been playing lately? Anything neat? Any thoughts on what I played? Let us know in the comments.

Guest Session Report: Star Trek: Ascendancy

Hey all!

Last weekend, my friend Eric Carter brought Star Trek: Ascendancy over for him, Ryan, and I to play.  It was a blast, but Eric wanted to type up his thoughts.  Consider this a guest session report/review!  Ryan and I will be back to writing later in the week.

My name is Eric Carter. I’ve played games with Ryan and Drew and many other amiable Midwesterners for nearly a decade. As an expert introvert, board gaming has given me an avenue to connect with other people. Of all the gifts the hobby has given me, that one is the most treasured.

I managed to find a great deal on this game at a store closure sale, and knowing that there is an expansion out there that allows me to play it solo, it was a no-brainer. I found the two available player expansions at another store that was selling them at a deep discount, then started a search for the dice and playmats, but decided I needed to see if this game would get played enough before spending more money on it.

One thing we’ve been trying to do more often is schedule game days where we decide ahead of time what will be played. This gives us the opportunity to devote more time to games that take longer to play or that have rules that take longer to teach. ST:A is perfect for such an occasion, and this past Saturday we got it to the table.

The game consists of players exploring the galaxy from their home planets from equidistant points of the play area. Players can send their ships out to discover worlds and exploit (nicely or not so nicely) the civilizations found thereon, or finding virgin worlds and setting up colonies to gather the resources necessary to build more ships, research various advancements, or build up their level of culture. Culture tokens are traded for Ascendancy tokens, and the higher a player’s Ascendancy level the more Fleets they can build, the more Starbases they can have, and they reach 5 Ascendancy they win the game. They could also win the game by controlling 3 home planets, and controlling one’s home planet is necessary for either win condition.

After reviewing the components and rules we got busy boldly going. Ryan took the Federation, Drew the Klingons, and I took on the role of the Romulans. Board gamers are very familiar with Player Powers, and Star Trek: Ascendancy utilizes its theme tremendously well by providing the players with a Federation that has a Prime Directive restriction (preventing them from invading planets or colonizing pre-warp civilizations,) but also giving them a boost for exploration. The Klingons are restricted from retreating from a space battle, but also get a boost from defeating enemies in those battles. The Romulans will not quickly accept an opponent’s peace offering (Trade Agreement), but can get a boost from researching their advancements. Those advancement decks for all of our factions added more thematic abilities throughout the game.

During the Federation’s first voyage, Ryan ran into the Space Amoeba (from Star Trek: The Original Series – The Immunity Syndrome) that wiped out half his fleet. The Romulans discovered a couple of worlds that had a low maximum number of space lanes that could connect to them, so I decided use them to build up a wall, a separation… a type of Neutral Zone, I guess you could say, to help keep Romulus safe from the Klingons, who were discovering highly versatile worlds right next door to Kronos. My warbirds would be safe if the Klingons couldn’t get to them, right? While this idea allowed me to build up my forces in relative safety, it proved to be problematic later on.

Drew’s Klingon Empire was built on book-learning. He had quickly established or took over enough laboratories to invest his research tokens into half a dozen projects at once while Ryan and I struggled to gather enough of those research tokens to build up our shields to prevent us from losing ships to the hazardous planets and phenomena we were encountering. He also had three cultural nodes in play within 3 or 4 turns and had gotten his third, then fourth, Ascendancy token before the second hour of play was over.

Seeing Drew’s imminent victory, the Romulans reached out to the Federation to join forces to attempt to forestall it as long as possible. Honestly, the was no hope that either Ryan or I could eke out a win, but so far we had zero space battles and we felt the need to explore more of what this game had to offer. There was one avenue available to us – the Klingons could not claim victory if they did not control their home planet, even if they had reached the goal of five Ascendancy tokens. Here’s where the Neutral Zone, which had served me so well up to this point, became my biggest weakness. I had finally established a connection with Drew’s area of the galaxy, but Romulus and my starbases were a minimum of seven sectors away. I managed to maneuver an existing fleet to Kronos while Drew’s forces were elsewhere, and they wiped the Klingons off the planet while they were busy reading their copies of Stephen Kahless’s A Brief History of Time.

The Klingons quickly returned and calmly discussed their disagreement with the Romulans through the use of superior firepower. But thanks to the order of operations in the game Drew was unable to reestablish control of Kronos in that turn, preventing his fifth Ascendancy token from doing him any good. The Federation had a similar gap between its area of the map, but one of the border planets had the capacity for another connection, so Ryan was able to explore his way over to Drew’s fleet, hoping to keep the Klingons from becoming the dominant faction in the galaxy. But the Federation are essentially a peaceful, exploratory bunch and so their fleets do not have the same ship capacity as the other two factions in the game. Having six ships to Drew’s dozen, Ryan could not prevail, and once Drew was able to send down one of his Klingons to pitch a tent and raise the Klingon flag, the game was done.

Gale Force Nine, the game’s publisher, has a solid gaming experience in Star Trek: Ascendancy. The game took nearly three hours from start to finish, and if we had not turtled in our own areas of the galaxy for so long and we had started interacting quicker, the game would probably have lasted another two.

The game is a heavy time investment, so it’ll likely not see casual play and we all have enough games that we want to get to the table that it probably won’t get scheduled again for some time. If I do invest in more of the promised player expansions (Vulcans and Andorians) and additional components available (the play mat, the additional dice and ships available for each faction), I will likely try to run this game at local gaming conventions. It’s definitely a game that not only elicits memories from the various Star Trek series, it also inspires fond memories through the situations you and your opponents create together.

Andrew’s Note: Eric not only is a friend of mine, he also is a Board Game Artist who has done work for games such as Dominion, Eminent Domain, Fleet, and many more.   In addition to board game art, he also sells board game themed t-shirts, glassware, stickers, and more at https://www.cafepress.com/meeplehut.

Remembering ML

Hey all:

This is going to be my post for the week and it’s a short one.

I started this blog as a spin off of a blog I started to help me deal with my mother’s death, which was one year ago today.  I wanted to start writing about something I enjoy, rather than something to use as a processing tool.

Anyways, I’m planning on spending the weekend with friends and family, so I figured I would post the only session review I have ever posted on BGG: Teaching my mother how to play Command and Colors: Ancients.

Enjoy, and be good to one another.

Taken from https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/493100/teaching-my-mother-cc

This is my first session report, and I will be focusing more on the teaching aspect than the actual game(s) we played, so bear with me.

My Mom is always interested in the games I am bringing home from college. I have gotten her to play Carcassonne, but she never really seemed too interested in wargames. My dad fought in Vietnam, so he never was interested in games or toys that, in his opinion glorified war. I did convince him to play a game of Memoir ’44, but that is another story for another day.

Anyway, my mom saw us playing Memoir and seemed kind of interested, so when I got CC:A for Christmas, I figured I would teach it to her. Well, tonight was a rare night where I came home from the University I attend, and I packed my games and told her to prepare to learn.

I selected the scenario, The Battle of Akragas, and prepared the game. She played as the Syracusians, and I took the Carthaginians. I spent about 15 minutes explaining the rules, and the differences between units, dealt the cards out, and we began playing.

She began by advancing her light units forward and harassing with ranged fire. It took her a while to understand the difference behind the rationale with firing 1 dice for a unit who has moved, and 2 dice for a unit who has held. I explained because the archers had to pack up their equipment in order to move.

I spent my first few turns by advancing my chariots and using my light troops for ranged fire. Eventually, I would move my Auxila and my Chariots into her light units to secure the win, 5 Banners to 3.

We spent the next 30 minutes or so discussing what she could have done differently. I explained that you really want to advance Heavy Infantry, esp. in a scenario like this, and she seemed to grasp the rationale for that. She did everything else right though, whether it was evading when I attacked her lights to even isolating one of my units so it couldn’t retreat.

She asked if we could play again, and naturally I agreed. We played the same scenario, because she wanted to try out some strategies that we had talked about.

This time she was much more agressive about moving her HI forward, all the while harassing my skirmishers with bow fire (She realized that if she left them, the dice rolls would be more favorable). She even pulled a screen with two Auxila and the one Medium Cav. unit. This game, my dice were hotter than the first game we played, and I won, 5 banners to 2.

Overall, I would say that she grasped the basic concepts well. She had a hard time understanding that the only units who could use ranged fire were the Lights. I think this could be avoided by finding/making a player aid that doesn’t contain as much information as the cards that are included in the game.

She is looking forward to playing again tomorrow night as well.

*On a side note, I recently recieved Ardennes ’44 in a trade and had the maps set up as if I was starting a new game just to get a feel for it. She took one look at it and asked how long it would take me to explain that game to her. I told her that we should play through the CC:A base and expansions, and then we could tackle that one *

(Edit: Fixed some typos)