Remembering ML

Hey all:

This is going to be my post for the week and it’s a short one.

I started this blog as a spin off of a blog I started to help me deal with my mother’s death, which was one year ago today.  I wanted to start writing about something I enjoy, rather than something to use as a processing tool.

Anyways, I’m planning on spending the weekend with friends and family, so I figured I would post the only session review I have ever posted on BGG: Teaching my mother how to play Command and Colors: Ancients.

Enjoy, and be good to one another.

Taken from https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/493100/teaching-my-mother-cc

This is my first session report, and I will be focusing more on the teaching aspect than the actual game(s) we played, so bear with me.

My Mom is always interested in the games I am bringing home from college. I have gotten her to play Carcassonne, but she never really seemed too interested in wargames. My dad fought in Vietnam, so he never was interested in games or toys that, in his opinion glorified war. I did convince him to play a game of Memoir ’44, but that is another story for another day.

Anyway, my mom saw us playing Memoir and seemed kind of interested, so when I got CC:A for Christmas, I figured I would teach it to her. Well, tonight was a rare night where I came home from the University I attend, and I packed my games and told her to prepare to learn.

I selected the scenario, The Battle of Akragas, and prepared the game. She played as the Syracusians, and I took the Carthaginians. I spent about 15 minutes explaining the rules, and the differences between units, dealt the cards out, and we began playing.

She began by advancing her light units forward and harassing with ranged fire. It took her a while to understand the difference behind the rationale with firing 1 dice for a unit who has moved, and 2 dice for a unit who has held. I explained because the archers had to pack up their equipment in order to move.

I spent my first few turns by advancing my chariots and using my light troops for ranged fire. Eventually, I would move my Auxila and my Chariots into her light units to secure the win, 5 Banners to 3.

We spent the next 30 minutes or so discussing what she could have done differently. I explained that you really want to advance Heavy Infantry, esp. in a scenario like this, and she seemed to grasp the rationale for that. She did everything else right though, whether it was evading when I attacked her lights to even isolating one of my units so it couldn’t retreat.

She asked if we could play again, and naturally I agreed. We played the same scenario, because she wanted to try out some strategies that we had talked about.

This time she was much more agressive about moving her HI forward, all the while harassing my skirmishers with bow fire (She realized that if she left them, the dice rolls would be more favorable). She even pulled a screen with two Auxila and the one Medium Cav. unit. This game, my dice were hotter than the first game we played, and I won, 5 banners to 2.

Overall, I would say that she grasped the basic concepts well. She had a hard time understanding that the only units who could use ranged fire were the Lights. I think this could be avoided by finding/making a player aid that doesn’t contain as much information as the cards that are included in the game.

She is looking forward to playing again tomorrow night as well.

*On a side note, I recently recieved Ardennes ’44 in a trade and had the maps set up as if I was starting a new game just to get a feel for it. She took one look at it and asked how long it would take me to explain that game to her. I told her that we should play through the CC:A base and expansions, and then we could tackle that one *

(Edit: Fixed some typos)

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